Why Prayer Liturgy?

Prayer liturgies are spiritual practices that shape us to love the face presence ofGod. The Psalmists and other ancients often reference this presence with words like these:  “Let the light of your face shine upon us, O LORD,” or again, “Restore us, O God; cause your face to shine; and we shall be saved.”

To learn more about prayer liturgies and how to prepare for participation in this sort of a prayer service please click the button below.


Cultural Labor is
Expressive Worship

How am I to be in Christ? 
What does God want for his creation?

Liturgy is
Formative Worship

It is the formative, liturgical aspect of worship that re- frames our loves.
See James K.A. Smith for an excellent lecture on this ancient Christian model.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGdhABH1j0Y


“What does post-literate mean for a text-based religion?”

To understand post-literate culture please read this excellent article, from which this image comes: https://mcluhangalaxy.wordpress.com/2013/07/10/lewis-lapham-invokes-marshall-mcluhan-in-warning-about-the-less-salutary-effects-of-post-literate-media/

To understand post-literate culture please read this excellent article, from which this image comes: https://mcluhangalaxy.wordpress.com/2013/07/10/lewis-lapham-invokes-marshall-mcluhan-in-warning-about-the-less-salutary-effects-of-post-literate-media/

As technology and globalization usher in a post-literate age in Western civilization a question of great significance surfaces for the Christian church: “What does post-literate mean for a text-based religion?”  More than ever, it means that we must re-imagine rituals and celebrations of the Christian Calendar as visual and social forums for the re-enactment of the story of Jesus.  The ancient future of the church is more urgent than ever before.  We must rely on resources from ages past when drama, symbols, and images were the stuff of communicating.  The embodied, tactile, sensory rituals of Baptism and Eucharist, given to us by the Lord, loudly proclaim that enacted story is a means to deep connection with the Divine through the remembering that gives birth to hoping!  How will we enact with symbol and story the spiritual practices that form our loves?


our liturgist

Dr. Matthew Hoskin

Matthew grew up in the evangelical, charismatic wing of the Anglican Church in rural Alberta and then Thunder Bay, Ontario. He has a Ph.D. in Church History from the University of Edinburgh, specialising in fifth-century Christianity and medieval manuscripts. His personal walk with Jesus has been informed by the ancient and medieval traditions for many years, beginning with St Francis in high school, and moving towards the Desert Fathers in his undergraduate days. After working with IVCF in Cyprus for a year, his appreciation for ancient ways of following the Way deepened, and he now desires to see the depth of ancient spirituality combine with the Protestant zeal for mission across the world, beginning in the secularised West. He explores these many intersections of Classical Christianity at his blog, “the pocket scroll.” He and his wife Jennifer live in Europe and welcome your prayers.